Advertisement

2018Ford F-350 Super Duty Diesel V-8 Big bang. Price and Reviews

2018Ford F-350 Super Duty Diesel V-8 Big bang. Price and Reviews

2018Ford F-350 Super Duty Diesel V-8 Big bang. Price and Reviews-You will find myriad advancements rolled in to the F-series Super Duty for 2017, including an brand new aluminum body and pickup bed (just like the light F-150), a stiffer material frame, and a modified Power Stroke turbo-diesel 6th. 7-liter V-8 engine option. Yet for truckers who occasionally venture into congested urban areas or restricted worksites, the Super Duty’s new variable-ratio steering system could be its most noteworthy enhancement.

2018Ford F-350 Super Duty Diesel V-8 Big bang. Price and Reviews

2018Ford F-350 Super Duty Diesel V-8 Big bang. Price and Reviews

Advertisement

The create provides the driver the impression of greater maneuverability by, as Ford puts it, mechanically adding or subtracting rotations to driver insight at the steering tyre. Said another way, for a given steering insight, front side wheels will change more at lower rates of speed and fewer at higher speeds. What’s truly special about the setup is that it’s based within the steering wheel’s heart, not in the driving gear itself, being common. This allowed Ford to retain the F-series’ hydraulically assisted recirculating-ball steering system, simplifying the manufacturing process.

How does it work? A planetary gearset attached between your steering wheel and the steering column gets inputs from an electric motor and the steerage wheel, leaving the driving shaft to the entry axle as the “output. ” At lower rates, the electric motor cushions driver inputs, turning the front wheels more for a given steering insight than they would at higher speeds.

2018Ford F-350 Super Duty Diesel V-8 Big bang. Price and Reviews

2018Ford F-350 Super Duty Diesel V-8 Big bang. Price and Reviews

Advertisement

The variable-ratio setup does not reduce the Super Duty’s turning circle, the steering definitely makes the enormous vehicle feel wieldier. We experienced almost no hand-over-hand flailing in parking lots–a common symptom of large trucks’ slow steering ratios–and we also noted an increased sense of stability at highway speeds. Some highway feel even manages to reach the driver’s hands. Our only qualm is that on an in a straight line road at about forty mph, caught between “low” and “high” road rates, the computer seems not sure of which steering proportion to select. This is felt as odd spikes or unexpected sags in response to small advices at the controls and some mild wandering.
The F-350’s frame can’t tow line it alone, of course, and that is where the adjusted 6. 7-liter Power Stroke V-8 diesel engine comes in. Ford altered the engine’s fuel-delivery setup, turbocharger, and electronic controls to up its peak revolt from 860 lb-ft to a mighty 925 lb-ft; the maximum horsepower retains at 440. This beast is an $8795 option over the standard six. 2-liter gasoline V-8, and it ably moves the F-350, unburdened or normally. We recorded a sharp 7. 2-second zero-to-60-mph time, again, class leading (until some other HD pickup truck beats it, of course). Engine response pulling from a stop can seem to be sluggish, and that’s because the computer limits rpm in the first 3 transmission gears (there are six total) to take care of traction force while protecting the drive line. Once underway, the engine settles into a sub-2000-rpm slumber. From idle to the 3600-rpm upshift point, the diesel is soft and so quiet that, from outside the vehicle, it’s challenging to distinguish from a gas mill. Stopping is equally smooth, with a decently linear your pedal returning a 202-foot stop from 70 mph; that qualifies of the same quality for something that weighs four plenty. We even recorded 12-15 mpg throughout our test–3 mpg much better than the previous F-350 we tested and on par with a F-150s we’ve evaluated.