2018 Ford F-150 5 Price and Reviews

2018 Ford F-150 5 Price and Reviews

2018 Ford F-150 5 Price and Reviews-Only aft of the truck’s more horizontal headlight and grille design live the most important changes. Beginning at the bottom of the lineup, Ford has downsized the F-150’s foundation, naturally aspirated V-6 from 3. 5 to 3. 3 liters by lowering the bore (the cva stays the same). The engine now features interface and direct fuel shot, a far higher compression ratio of 12. zero: 1 (up from 15. 8: 1), and reduced internal friction. Peak horse power jumps by eight to 290, albeit 250 revoltion per minute later at 6500 revoltion per minute, just shy of redline, and torque increases doze lb-ft to 265 and peaks 250 rpm faster than last year at a still high 4,000 rpm. The 3. 3-liter is standard on the XL and XLT but is unavailable otherwise.

 

2018 Ford F-150 5 Price and Reviews

2018 Ford F-150 5 Price and Reviews

Up coming in-line is the EcoBoost twin-turbocharged 2. 7-liter V-6, a $995 option on XL and XLT and standard on the Lariat cut level. It qualifies as “second generation” by Ford’s measure, keeping its elegant compacted-graphite iron and lightweight aluminum block and boasting the same dual-injection capability as the 3. 3-liter, as well as a new exhaust-gas-recirculation (EGR) system and reduced internal friction. Maximum horsepower holds at 325 and is available 750 rpm lower in the rev range at 5000 rpm, while torque advances 25 lb-ft to an even 400 and interests 250 rpm sooner at 2750 rpm.

2018 Ford F-150 5 Price and Reviews

2018 Ford F-150 5 Price and Reviews

Ford still left alone the other available EcoBoost, the twin-turbocharged 3. 5-liter V-6, as well as its higher-output brother that powers the similarly unchanged F-150 Raptor, as that engine was new last year. The 375-hp engine is the burliest in the conventional F-150 range–and a steal at between $600 and $2895 when included with the XL, XLT, Lariat, King Farm, and Platinum models. That is standard on the range-topping F-150 Limited. In comparison with the updated 5. 0-liter V-8 ($1995 extra on XL and XLT, $1000 on the Lariat, and standard on the King Ranch and Platinum), the 3. 5-liter rules with a whopping 470 lb-ft torque capacity. The 5. 0-liter inherits the same port and immediate fuel-injection capability as the rest of the F-150’s engine range to produce 10 more horsepower and 13 more lb-ft than before, for totals of 395 horsepower and 500 lb-ft.

Ford’s 10-speed computerized transmission is no much longer exclusive to trucks with the 3. 5-liter EcoBoost. That gearbox replaces the six-speed computerized that was previously paired with the 2. 7-liter and the 5. 0-liter. Ford held the tried-and-true six-speed computerized for 3 of the. 3-liter V-6, citing cost and drivability goals. With help from the engine updates, the new 10-speed, and the stop/start feature that’s now standard on all F-150s, EPA-estimated fuel-economy numbers edge up by 1 or 2 miles per gallon for each and every powertrain except the carryover 3. 5-liter EcoBoost. Expect bigger fuel-economy benefits from the upcoming diesel powered V-6 option, a past due arrival due in spring and coil 2018 we haven’t yet had a chance to drive.

Incremental though they are really, Ford’s powertrain updates are welcome. The 2. 7-liter EcoBoost V-6 is now even more desirable, thanks to its punchier torque and the wider ratio get spread around of the 10-speed compared to the old six-speed. The tiny six-cylinder sounds great under load, too, and gives off a satisfying turbo whistle when the driver really sticks the spurs to it. Traditionalists, for who Ford continues to offer the 5. 0-liter V-8, likely will be more pleased by the continuing availability of the top, normally aspirated engine than worried about the marginal advancements to its performance. Appears much the same as before, meaning its low-end torque isn’t as pleasing or as early to arrive as the EcoBoost engines’, which match or outgun it regarding this. Even now, there’s no beating the five-oh’s muscle-car soundtrack and linear, old-school power delivery that builds thrust to a crescendo near redline.

As we noted in our test of the 2017 F-150 with the 3. 5-liter EcoBoost and this same 10-speed, with the many gears to choose from and the ability to lock, uncover, and even partially locking mechanism its torque converter to maximize efficiency or to smooth over a change, the transmission can stay busy no matter what engine it’s bolted to. For the most part, one must talk to the comically long string of digits from one to 10 displayed in the gauge cluster to trail the transmission’s behavior. In normal driving, the indication skips gears when increasing and decelerating to avoid shift pileups, and it runs sequentially through every single gear only under full throttle or when driven gently, as during, say, the EPA’s fuel-economy testing procedures.

Busy also describes the six-speed programmed attached to the new 3. 3-liter V-6, although for different reasons. Absent the broad and toned torque curve of their turbocharged siblings, the V-6 forces the six-speed to shift often to keep up momentum. We owned two F-150s with that engine: a stripped-out two-wheel-drive, extended-cab F-150 XL and a four-wheel-drive, crew-cab XLT. Both felt slow, a condition exacerbated when we loaded the crew cab’s bed with a 1200-pound bundle of horse give.